What's New

Topics 2017

March 2017

Mar. 24, 2017 Updated
Tanegashima Space Museum to Reopen

On March 26, Tanegashima space museum will reopen after its first renovation in 20 years. Among its new attractions are Liftoff Theater where visitors watch dynamic rocket launches, Kibo Photo Spot where photos can be taken that resemble zero gravity, and Rocket Garage where H-II Rocket No. 7 and other launch vehicles are on display.
The exhibition space of Masuda Tracking and Communication Station has also been updated.
JAXA cordially welcomes visitors.

Tanegashima Space Museum to Reopen

Mar. 23, 2017 Updated
Continued Record Low Antarctic Sea Ice Extent

Global sea ice extent hit record low, according to observations from Shizuku on Global Change Observation Mission on January 14, 2017. It is all time low in the history of GCOM-W operation that started in 1978, JAXA continues operation of Shizuku and GCOM-C and monitoring arctic sea ice extent, off the coast of Greenland Sea and the rest of the arctic circle.
Related information is also available at the following links:

Continued Record Low Antarctic Sea Ice Extent

February 2017

Feb. 22, 2017 Updated
QZS-1 off to the Cabinet Office's Control

On February 28, 2017, JAXA discontinues the operation of QZS-1, the First Quasi-Zenith Satellite MICHIBIKI. Control will be transferred to the Cabinet Office. For details, please refer to:

QZS-1 off to the Cabinet Office's Control

Feb. 21, 2017 Updated
GCOM-W: Sea Ice Hits Record Low

Global sea ice extent hit record low, according to observations from Shizuku on Global Change Observation Mission on January 14, 2017. It is all time low in the history of GCOM-W operation that started in 1978, JAXA continues operation of Shizuku and GCOM-C and monitoring arctic sea ice extent, off the coast of Greenland Sea and the rest of the arctic circle.
Related information is also available at the following links:

GCOM-W: Sea Ice Hits Record Low

Feb. 6, 2017 Updated
KOUNOTORI6 completed its mission with re-entry!

The KOUNOTORI6 (HTV6, a cargo transporter to the International Space Station) left the ISS on Jan. 28 and re-entered the atmosphere at around 0:06 a.m. on Feb. 6 (Japan Standard Time.)
KOUNOTORI6 successfully completed its cargo supply mission to the ISS.

KOUNOTORI6 completed its mission with re-entry!

January 2017

Jan. 16, 2017 Updated
Successful deployment of six CubeSats delivered by KOUNOTORI6

On January 16, 2017, from 6:10 p.m. - 7:50 p.m. (Japan time), a total of six microsatellites abroad HTV6 were successfully deployed into orbit from the Japanese Experiment Module ("Kibo").
These CubeSats were discharged on December 9 aboard the H-II Transfer Vehicle KOUNOTORI6 and arrived at the ISS on December 14 ,2016.
On December 19, STARS-C CubeSat was also deployed from KIBO.

Successful deployment of six CubeSats delivered by KOUNOTORI6

Jan. 11, 2017 Updated
Completion of KIKU No. 8 Operation

At 3:25 p.m., (Japan Standard Time) January 10, 2017, JAXA terminated its Engineering Test Satellite-VIII KIKU No.8 (ETS-III) transmission, thus brought a closure to the satellite’s operation.
KIKU No. 8 was built for demonstration and experiment, with the purpose of improvement of mobile communications system. When Japan earthquake and tsunami of 2011 broke out, the satellite did the much needed service of providing the internet access for the afflicted region.
Launched on December 18, 2006, KIKU No. 8 marked its 3-year mission period and on December 18, 2016, completed its 10-year design life. The satellite’s fuel ran low that controlled its attitude and orbit after the decade long operation. In addition, an outdated satellite lying in space can undermine the operation of others. Therefore JAXA made a call to discontinue using the probe. KIKU No. 8 was thrown out of its stationary orbit and ceased to function.

Completion of KIKU No. 8 Operation

Updates 2017

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