Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2) Topics

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Apr. 21, 2016 Updated
DAICHI-2 received the MEXT science and technology award

The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) recognizes remarkable achievements of R&D and the promotion of understanding in the science and technology field by presenting an award, the MEXT minister’s award in the field of science and technology.
Development and research members of DAICHI-2 received the JFY 2016 MEXT minister science and technology award (development section). Technology for high accuracy observations on diastrophism was appreciated.
With this technology, JAXA continues to observe tectonic movement and land sliding status caused by the 20106 Kumamoto Earthquake.

DAICHI-2 received the MEXT science and technology award

Mar. 17, 2016 Updated
DAICHI-2 honored by central emergency communications council

DAICHI-2 received an award for its contributions to anti-disaster operations by the council (*) on March 16, 2016. DAICHI-2 performs emergency observations in response to requests from disaster preparation agencies, and swiftly provides data to understand signs of disasters and their status.
For emergency observations of a volcanic eruption at Kuchinoerabu Island, we provided observation data about four hours after the explosion following a request from the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The data analysis results by disaster prevention agencies was then reported to the Coordinating Committee for the Prediction of Volcanic Eruptions of the JMA to learn about the changes in the crater, falling ash, and pyroclastic flows. (Image: Kuchinoerabu Island just after the eruption shot by DAICHI-2)
When volcanic activity begun at Sakurajima and Hakone, DAICHI-2 also observed the status with its capacity of detecting tectonic movements down to centimeters. The acquired data was also analyzed by disaster prevention agencies for use by JMA to determine the level of alert/warning issues and for respective municipal governments to set up access restrictions.
JAXA continues to support disaster measures through satellite technology.

* Central emergency communications council: The council was established for smooth communication in times of emergencies like a natural disaster, and it honors individuals and organizations that make significant achievements in this area.

DAICHI-2 honored by central emergency communications council

May 14, 2015 Updated
Agreement concluded with MLIT on DAICHI-2 observation data

JAXA concluded an agreement with the Kyushu Regional Development Bureau of the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) on April 30, 2015, to provide observation data by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 “DAICHI-2” (ALOS-2). The purpose of the agreement is to survey (1) secular changes of landscape and ash fall and (2) isolated islands for their up keep. We will work together to conduct surveys more efficiently with broader covering areas by mutually sharing and studying observation data possessed by the Kyushu Regional Development Bureau and JAXA's satellite data.
Taking this opportunity of concluding the agreement, we would like to contribute to a safe and secure society by expanding the use of satellites.

Agreement concluded with MLIT on DAICHI-2 observation data

Jan. 23, 2015 Updated
ALOS-2/CIRC data is open to public!

After the calibration and validation of ALOS-2/CIRC, JAXA confirmed the data quality of ALOS-2/CIRC is adequate. All ALOS-2/CIRC data is avaliable from CIRC observation data search, if user follows the CIRC data policy.
The ultimate goal of the CIRC project is to minimize the damage and impact caused by forest fires, as well as contributing to urban planning and our understanding of volcanic disasters.

ALOS-2/CIRC data is open to public!

Nov. 25, 2014 Updated
“DAICHI-2” Regular Provision of Observation Data

JAXA began regular provision of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 “DAICHI-2” (ALOS-2) observation data today as we have completed its initial functional confirmation and calibration operations as scheduled.
The ALOS-2 Data Distribution Consortium is the contact point for general users to receive DAICHI-2 observation data. Please refer to the press release for further information.

“DAICHI-2” Regular Provision of Observation Data

Sep. 30, 2014 Updated
DAICHI-2 captured Mt. Ontake eruption

Mt. Ontake straddling Nagano and Gifu prefectures erupted at 11:52 a.m. on Sept. 27, 2014. JAXA has been observing the volcanic activity and its impact by earth observation satellites. The DAICHI-2 acquired data on Mt. Ontake on Sept. 27, 28, and 29. As it started regular observation operations in early August and captured some images of Mt. Ontake prior to the eruption, we can compare images taken before and after the incident to study changes and the situation.
The following image is a bird’s-eye view near the peak of Mt. Ontake after the eruption. A depression is found in the area circled yellow.
For more details of the observation result by the DAICHI-2, please refer to the following website.

DAICHI-2 captured Mt. Ontake eruption

Aug. 11, 2014 Updated
First Image Data Acquisition by CIRC onboard DAICHI-2

Compact Infrared Camera (CIRC) is a technology demonstration payload onboard the DAICHI-2. CIRC is an infrared sensor intended for observing forest fires, volcanoes, and heat island phenomena.
Since the initial functional verification phase (July 4-14, 2014), CIRC has acquired the following images of Earth.
Image: Night image of California (CST 00:20).

First Image Data Acquisition by CIRC onboard DAICHI-2

Jun. 27, 2014 Updated
First Image Data from“DAICHI-2” (ALOS-2)

JAXA acquired images from the PALSAR-2 aboard the "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2).
The DAICHI-2 was launched on May 24, 2014, and it is currently under initial functional verification. The images were captured during the verification stage.

The DAICHI-2’s observation data is expected to contribute to understanding damages from a disaster, monitoring deforestation, and more efficiently understanding farming areas.
We plan to start offering images to the general public in late November.

Comparison of images taken by PALSAR-2 and DAICHI PALSAR (Urayasu City)

before
after


Comparison of images taken by PALSAR-2 and the synthetic aperture radar aboard airplane (Nishinoshima Island)

before
after


PALSAR-2 movies



First Image Data from“DAICHI-2” (ALOS-2)

May 27, 2014 Updated
DAICHI-2 critical operation phase successfully completed! Initial function verification starts!

The DAICHI-2 launched from the Tanegashima Space Center on May 24 performed important tasks including L-band synthetic aperture radar deployment after its injection into the orbit, thus its critical operation phase was successfully completed.
The DAICHI-2 will take about two and a half months to verify the function of its onboard equipment and instruments in space. We expect to be able to publish images taken by the DAICHI-2 for the first time in a few weeks to a month, if everything goes as scheduled.

DAICHI-2 critical operation phase successfully completed! Initial function verification starts!

May 24, 2014 Updated
Successful launch of H-IIA F 24 with DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2)!

The launch of the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 24 with The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2) aboard was successfully performed at 12:05:14 p.m. on May 24 (Sat.) 2014 (Japan Standard Time).
The launch vehicle flew normally and separated the DAICHI-2 at about 15 minutes and 47 seconds after liftoff. The DAICHI-2 will conduct critical phase operations including deploying the PALSER-2 antenna. We await your support messages!

Successful launch of H-IIA F 24 with DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2)!

May 22, 2014 Updated
DAICHI-2/H-IIA F24 to be launched soon! Live broadcast from 11:15 a.m. on May 24 (Sat.)

The launch time of the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 14 (H-IIA F14) with the DAICHI-2 onboard was set for 12:05:14 p.m. on May 24 (Sat.) 2014 (Japan Standard Time).
JAXA will broadcast a live launch report from the Tanegashima Space Center from 11:15 a.m. on the day. You can watch it through the Internet at home. Please do not miss this event!
Please send your support messages for the mission, or tweet it including the hashtag #daichi2.

DAICHI-2/H-IIA F24 to be launched soon! Live broadcast from 11:15 a.m. on May 24 (Sat.)

May 1, 2014 Updated
DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2) revealed to the media at TNSC

On March 28 (Fri.), the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 “DAICHI-2”(ALOS-2) was revealed to the press at the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA-2) at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC.)
Project manager Shinichi Suzuki, who has been involved in the project since the DAICHI, the predecessor of the DAICHI-2, commented, “We have developed high-quality radar and data transmission technologies this time. Whenever our test results did not seem logical, we discussed the results in cooperation with the manufacturer and related workers to find a solution. Now, I would like to brace myself for the launch."

The DAICHI-2 will be launched by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 24 on May 24 (Sat.) after going through final preparations. Once the DAICHI-2 is launched, we hope it will work hard for us without coming back to the Earth again.
DAICHI-2, have a safe trip under the best preparations!

Support messages for the DAICHI-2 launch are welcomed at the special site.

DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2) revealed to the media at TNSC

Mar. 31, 2014 Updated
DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2) transportation to Tanegashima

We would like to report to you the transportation of the DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2) from the Mitsubishi Electric's Kamakura Works, where its assembly and tests were conducted, to the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC).
Preparation for the transportation began around noon on Feb. 21.After midnight, or in the very early morning of the 22nd, the DAICHI, packed in a container, was loaded onto a large truck to go to Kawasaki Port.
The container was then placed on a boat at the port to make a 56-hour trip by sea to Shimama Port on Tanegashima Island.
The container unloaded from the ship waited on a large tractor till late at night when traffic became lighter, and it was transported to the TNSC.
The DAICH-2 was moved into the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2) at the TNSC and unpacked there. The satellite will undergo various checks there.

DAICHI-2 (ALOS-2) transportation to Tanegashima

Mar. 14, 2014 Updated
Launch date set for DAICHI-2 on H-IIA F24!

The launch date and time for the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 24 (H-IIA F24) with the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2) onboard was decided to be at around 12:05 p.m. thru 12:20 p.m. (JST) on May 24 (Sat.,) 2014 (Japan Standard Time.)
The "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2) is a follow-on mission from the “DAICHI” (ALOS). It is equipped with the L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR-2), and its major mission objectives are to secure the safety of people’s lives and to solve global environmental problems.
The latest information about the DAICHI-2 and its launch preparation status will be updated on this page.

Launch date set for DAICHI-2 on H-IIA F24!

Oct. 17, 2012 Updated
Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2: System thermal vacuum test

The thermal vacuum test for the Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "ALOS-2" started on Oct. 16th at the Tsukuba Space Center. It is scheduled to be completed in late November.
The thermal vacuum test is to verify if electric functions and thermal controls of the satellite properly work in the 13mφ space chamber that simulates the space environment.
The photo here was taken on Oct. 3rd. It shows the satellite's main body preparing for the test.

Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2: System thermal vacuum test

Apr. 18, 2012 Updated
PALSAR-2 impulse response evaluation under vacuum environment

From March 5 to 9, JAXA conducted impulse response evaluation of the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR-2) aboard Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) under vacuum environment in 6-Meter-Diameter Radiometer Space Chamber Building at the Tsukuba Space Center.
The impulse response evaluation under vacuum environment is to verify the PALSAR-2's performance and functions in a vacuum environment that is close to that in space.
PALSAR-2 is additionally installed with a new observation function called“Spotlight mode.” Thus its resolution target is one to three meters, which is far better than its predecessor ALOS/PALSAR, whose resolution is about 10 meters. Also, the PALSAR-2 can enlarge its observation area by about three times so that it can quickly provide data with higher accuracy and increase observation frequency.

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