Global Precipitation Measurement/Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR) Topics

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Apr. 21, 2016 Updated
GSMap received the MEXT science and technology award

Development and research members of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP) received the JFY2016 minister’s science and technology award (science and technology promotion section) of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).
GSMaP was appreciated for its quasi-real time provision system of high accuracy precipitation distribution data as such data had been less accurate and the provision of such data had often been delayed.
GSMap is used for weather and hydrological agencies and organizations in Asia, Africa, Oceania, Europe and the U.S to contribute to reduce damage due to precipitation by monitoring precipitation and flood prediction. In addition, the data is published on the website of the “Global Rainfall Watch” and “Realtime Rainfall Watch” for ordinary users to easily access it.

GSMap received the MEXT science and technology award

Nov. 2, 2015 Updated
Release of the JAXA Realtime Rainfall Watch

Earth Observation Research Center (EORC) of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has developed GSMaP realtime version (GSMaP_NOW) providing rainfall information of current hour, and released those information through a new webpage “JAXA Realtime Rainfall Watch”.
While GSMaP near-real-time version (GSMaP_NRT) is provided with 4-hour data latency, which consists of 3-hour for data gathering and 1-hour for processing, GSMaP_NOW is provided in quasi-realtime and updated every half-hour. For example, hourly GSMaP_NOW image and data during 0930Z and 1029Z is available at around 1030Z through the web site.

Release of the JAXA Realtime Rainfall Watch

Sep. 2, 2014 Updated
GPM providing 3D precipitation data

Data acquired by the GPM Core Observatory, the JAXA/NASA joint development mission, has been provided to the public since Sept. 2.
The observatory was subjected to calibration operations to improve its data accuracy, and as the operations were completed, the acquired “GPM products”are now available for public users through the online Earth observation satellite data provision system called “Global Portal System,” or“G-Portal.”
GPM products contribute to more accurate understanding of global precipitation including rain and snow to be utilized for improving weather forecast precision and prediction of typhoon paths through data assimilation among world meteorological organizations including the Japan Meteorological Agency. They are also expected to be useful for preparations for floods in Asian countries.

GPM providing 3D precipitation data

Mar. 25, 2014 Updated
First Images Available from JAXA-NASA Global Rain and Snowfall Satellite

JAXA and the NASA have released the first images captured by their newest Earth-observing satellite, GPM Core Observatory, which launched into space Feb. 28 (JST).

The images show precipitation falling inside a March 10 cyclone over the northwest Pacific Ocean, east of Japan. The data were collected by the GPM Core Observatory's two instruments: JAXA's Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which imaged a three-dimensional cross-section of the storm; and, NASA's GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which observed precipitation across a broad swath.

First Images Available from JAXA-NASA Global Rain and Snowfall Satellite

Feb. 28, 2014 Updated
Successful launch of H-IIA F23 with GPM core ovservatory aboard!

The launch of the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 23 with the core observatory for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission aboard was successfully performed at 3:37 a.m. on February 28 (Fri.) 2014 (JST).
The launch vehicle flew normally and separated the GPM core observatory at about 15 minutes and 57 seconds after liftoff. The GPM core observatory will conduct critical phase operations.
We await your support messages!

Successful launch of H-IIA F23 with GPM core ovservatory aboard!

Jan. 17, 2014 Updated
GPM core observatory revealed to the media

On January 17 (Fri.), the GPM core observatory was shown to the media in the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2) at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC).
The observatory was transported to the TNSC from the U.S. on Nov. 27, and its launch preparations at the launch site will continue ahead of its departure to space sometime between 3:07 a.m. and 5:07 a.m. on February 28 by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 23.
Updated information about the preparation status in a timely manner is available on the GPM/DPR special site. Your continued support is appreciated!

GPM core observatory revealed to the media

Dec. 26, 2013 Updated
Launch date set for GPM/DPR on H-IIA F23! Special site now available!

The launch date and time for the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 23 (H-IIA F23) withThe core observatory for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission onboard was decided to be at around 3:07 a.m. thru 5:07 a.m. (JST) on February 28 (Fri.,) 2014.
We opened a special site for the GPM/DPR, please have a look!

Nov. 29, 2013 Updated
GPM core observatory arrived at TNSC!

The core observatory for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission, which arrived at Kitakyushu Airport at 12:28 p.m. on Nov. 24 (Sun.) from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, was then transported via sea and land to the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 at the Tanegashima Space Center at 2:24 a.m. on the 27th (Wed.)
The observatory arrived at Shimama Port in Tanegashima by cargo ship on the evening of the 26th, then its transportation to the TNSC begun at midnight. A skilled transportation team slowly and carefully moved the observatory to the center at a speed of about 15 km/hour.

Nov. 25, 2013 Updated
GPM core observatory jointly developed by JAXA and NASA arrived in Japan!

The core observatory for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission arrived at Kitakyushu Airport in Japan from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the U.S.A. about 12:28 p.m. on Nov. 24 (Sun.) The GPM core observatory was jointly developed by JAXA and NASA. After arrival at the airport, the satellite was then transported to the Tanegashima Space Center by cargo ship for launch by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle. Its arrival here was originally scheduled for the 22nd, but it was delayed for two days due to bad weather in Alaska, where the cargo plane stopped for refueling.

The GPM mission is a joint international project to observe global precipitation conditions quite frequently and accurately by combining the core observatory and a consternation of some eight satellites. The GPM mission will begin on a full scale when the core observatory, which came to Japan today, is launched, and it will become useful in many ways for our daily life including global-scale water resource control, damage mitigation for water-related disasters such as typhoons and floods, and weather forecasting accuracy improvement.

The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) aboard the GPM core observatory developed by JAXA is one of the cutting-edge observation devices developed in Japan. It enables three-dimensional observations of rain with high sensitivity.

Apr. 9, 2013 Updated
Global Precipitation Measurement Live Event Ask JAXA and NASA!

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) main satellite has been jointly developed by JAXA and NASA, and is scheduled to be launched in JFY 2013.
To facilitate a greater understanding on this mission, NASA will hold a live event where NASA and JAXA project managers and researchers will answer your questions. The questions will be asked through Twitter. You can send questions from Japan with the hashtag "#askJAXA". Your participation is very welcomed! (Image: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Conceptual Image Lab)

[Event Information]
You can watch the live broadcast on NASA TV in English.

Live broadcast NASA TV Educational Channel
NASA Cherry Blossom Social - GSFC * (Education Channel)
Broadcast schedule From 11:00 p.m. on April 12 (Fri.) to 0:30 a.m. on April 13 (Sat.) (Japan Standard Time)
Or
From 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on April 12 (Fri.) (Eastern Daylight Time)
Event Host NASA

[How to ask questions]

  • Follow JAXA twitter account "@satellite_jaxa".
  • Questions will be accepted during the live broadcast. Tweet your question about GPM or DPR with the hashtag "#askJAXA". Questions can be in the Japanese language.
  • The questions that are addressed during the live event will also be published in Japanese on JAXA’s Satellite Applications Mission Directorate I Twitter :: (@satellite_jaxa).
  • Please be aware that we may not be able to answer all questions due to time constraints.

[Other remarks]

  • If you do not have a Twitter account, please get one before participating in the event.
  • If you have any inquiries about Twitter, please directly ask them to the Twitter site. JAXA cannot answer such inquiries.

Jun. 6, 2012 Updated
The integration of the DPR was successfully completed

The integration of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) onto the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory was successfully completed in May 2012.

This DPR is expected to be much more versatile than the TRMM precipitation radar (also provided by JAXA) and these two are the only radar instruments currently dedicated to precipitation measurements from space. The data obtained by the DPR along with that of the NASA GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), also flown on the Core Spacecraft, will be used as a calibration standard for rainfall estimation from the GPM constellation satellites. The GPM mission will enable global measurement of precipitation every three hours.


Two box- type instruments are DPR (C)NASA

Silver colored instrument on upper side is GMI made by NASA (C)NASA

Apr. 2, 2012 Updated
DPR Delivered to NASA

Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) that will be installed on the core satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was delivered to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD on March 30.
Following installation of the DPR on the GPM Core Spacecraft, NASA will perform the spacecraft system testing at GSFC, and then be shipped to Japan for launch by the H-IIA launch vehicle in FY2013.
This DPR is expected to be much more versatile than the TRMM precipitation radar (also provided by JAXA) and these two are the only radar instruments currently dedicated to precipitation measurements from space. The data obtained by the DPR along with that of the NASA GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), also flown on the Core Spacecraft, will be used as a calibration standard for rainfall estimation from the GPM constellation satellites. The GPM mission will enable global measurement of precipitation every three hours.
(Top photo: DPR arrived at NASA Goddard Space Center / Bottom: Signing ceremony for delivery / Photos by NASA)

Feb. 10, 2012 Updated
Dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) released to the media

On Feb. 9, JAXA unveiled the dual frequency precipitation radar (DPR), which will be onboard the main satellite for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project.
A press conference was also held on the same day, and project personnel not only from JAXA, but also from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and NASA explained the outline of the DPR and GPM main satellite. They also described possible contributions from the GPM project to research elucidating climate and water circulation changes, improving weather forecast accuracy, and use in damage preparation caused by water and wind such as floods.
The DPR will be transferred to NASA to be aboard the GPM main satellite, then the satellite will be launched by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center.

Sep. 7, 2011 Updated
Logo for GPM dual-frequency precipitation radar selected

JAXA has decided on the logo mark for the dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) aboard the main satellite of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project.
As an international program, the GPM project has been led by Japan and the U.S. to observe global precipitation (such as rain and snow). JAXA is developing the DPR with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT.)
The DPR, a high-performance precipitation measurement device, will be aboard the GPM main satellite to be launched by the H-IIA launch vehicle. Once it arrives in space, the radar is expected to contribute to compiling a high-precision global precipitation map.
The DPR, which has been tested at the Tsukuba Space Center, will be transported to a NASA facility to be combined with the part developed by NASA.

Jun. 30, 2011 Updated
Integration test of the dual-frequency precipitation radar with KuPR and KaPR

The dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project has been under development. The DPR will be loaded onto the main satellite of the GPM project, which aims to broaden observation coverage to a higher latitude compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. The DPR is equipped with two different frequency radars of Ku-band and Ka-band (KuPR and KaPR,) and it can observe light rain, pouring rain and snow simultaneously.
KuPR-KaPR co-operation test on May 25th, using a protoflight model, confirmed combined operations of the two radars which consist of the DPR at the electromagnetic shield room for the electromagnetic compatibility test in the Satellite Test Building Radiometer Ion Test Laboratory at the Tsukuba Space Center.

Aug. 3, 2009 Updated
Memorandum of Understanding with NASA for cooperation in GPM Project

JAXA and NASA signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) on development and operation activities for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project to measure precipitation (such as rain and snow) using a multiple number of satellites on July 31, 2009 (Japan Standard Time). With this MOU, the two organizations will further deepen the cooperative relationship and exercise comprehensive leadership utilizing the research and development ability and personnel of the two parties.

Mar. 18, 2009 Updated
Vibration test of the DPR thermal/structural models

Development of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which will be installed in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite, has been underway. The DPR is composed of two radars with two different frequencies (KuPR and KaPR) to precisely measure light rain, heavy rain and snow at the same time. We are carrying out environment tests using the DPR thermal and structural models at the Tsukuba Space Center. The photo shows the vibration test on the Ku-band radar model.

Oct. 17, 2008 Updated
Testing the KuPR Radar Engineering Model

Development of the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) that will be installed in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite has been underway. The DPR is composed of two antennas with two different frequencies (KuPR and KaPR) to precisely measure light rain, heavy rain and snow at the same time. We are carrying out the antenna pattern measurement and radar operation verification for the Ku band radar by using its engineering model at the Radio Test Building at the TKSC.

Apr. 30, 2002 Updated

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) concept was based on TRMM`s achievements, and this concept is currently being studied. The GPM satellites consist of a TRMM-type primary satellite that carries a radar and a microwave radiometer and a fleet of constellation satellites that carry microwave radiometers. The primary satellite plans to go to higher latitudes than TRMM to extend the coverage. The constellation satellites will measure precipitation frequently and globally. GPM is currently planned to start operating in 2007-2008 timeframe. The primary satellite is planned to carry a Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a microwave radiometer. The combination of these two instruments will improve the accuracy of rainfall measurement and also realize snowfall observation, especially at higher latitudes. The 2nd GPM International Planning Workshop will be held from 20th (Mon.) through 22nd (Wed.) May 2002 at the Shinagawa Prince Hotel in Tokyo. The National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL) and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will co-host this workshop. Please see more details here.

The 2nd GPM International Planning Workshop

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